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EarthGrl
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RockHoundLounger

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Help with Identification
Oct 9th, 2017 at 11:33am
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Hello, could anyone tell me what this is? I found it in a dry creek bed. I did a Google search and the closest thing I've come across is coral fossils. It appears to have honeycomb shapes, and I believe I saw some crystal formations.
  

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Brittany
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JoeM
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Re: Help with Identification
Reply #1 - Oct 9th, 2017 at 8:00pm
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Hey there EarthGrl! Welcome to the Board! Wink
Good luck with all your rockhounding adventures!
Sounds like you've got a good eye for it, and as you have all ready discovered, there's a lot of research that goes along with it. Out there in your area are a lot of fossils so you might want to get yourself a little fossil handbook. Learning to ID some of the fossils in the field will help you date the area, or dirt or rock, you are looking at.
Pretty cool stuff and will add to your outings. Smiley

Anyway you all ready guessed this one right. It's plain to see it's a squarshed, or flattened, petrified honey bee hive, or honeycomb. Cheesy
Just kidding!
It is a coral fossil. In the large family of Simple Coelenterates, you have the "Tabulates", and this probably a form of "Favosite", more commonly known as "the honeycomb coral". Favosites and related species are widespread in North America and date to the middle Silurian, or about 430 million years ago. They are well exposed in Americas' Heartland along the Ohio and Mississippi Valleys.
Tennessee has Favosites and another coral that looks similar called "Lithostrotionella"which is pretty stuff. And another similar type of coral is "Hexagonaria percarinata", otherwise known as Michigans "Petoskey Stone".
Thank goodness for nicknames like honeycomb coral and Petoskey Stone. Wink
Anyway, there's a few names for you to look up.
Good luck with the hunt!

  
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EarthGrl
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RockHoundLounger

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Re: Help with Identification
Reply #2 - Oct 9th, 2017 at 8:50pm
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Thanks so much! I am really excited to learn more about this stuff. I will definitely find a book on fossils.
Lol yeah that would be neat. A coral fossil is still very interesting though. I do remember coming across Favosite fossils when I did a Google search, but the ones I saw were much more detailed. I will certainly look those up!
Thank you again for the Help!  Smiley
  

Brittany
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Ryan T.
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Re: Help with Identification
Reply #3 - Oct 13th, 2017 at 1:48pm
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If I had to venture a guess, I'd also go with favosite. The best favosites I've found have been in Ohio, and the best Petoskey stones in my collection come from Michigan.
  
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